Welcome to Edinburg, ND!

 

Northeast North Dakota is a well-kept secret, especially the little town of Edinburg. It sits on the edge of the fertile farmland of the Red River Valley and the prairies of the west. Edinburg has a population of about 190 people with the drive, dreams and heart of cities 10 times its size. Edinburg could be a "throw-back" to the 50's with its pristine cleanliness, manicured yards and well-kept homes, but it is most definitely planted in the 21st century with citizens who strive to keep Edinburg very much alive!

Edinburg is a great place to live!

 

This Week's news

DURING WWII N. ORDAHL, THE BANKER AT THE TIME, COMPILED, TYPED AND SENT A HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER TO THE LOCAL SERVICEMEN SERVING OUR COUNTRY. HE WANTED THE MEN AND WOMEN TO KNOW WHAT WAS GOING ON BACK HOME. DAVID MONSON GAVE ME COPIES OF THE PAPERS CALLED "THE SERVICEMAN". I WILL SHARE A FEW TIDBITS FROM TIME TO TIME.

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A MORNING SOLILOQUY FROM THE 1945 SERVICEMAN

Mr Ordahl wrote this in September of 1945:

One always becomes spellbound when traversing the area between Park River and Grafton. We view the rich farm lands, well watered and richly timberland along the river, with numerous planted groves dotting the level prairies from horizon to horizon. The "Bread Basket of the World" was the name given this area by a pioneer governor of North Dakota.

How the hearts of the early pioneers must have swelled with joy as they viewed for the first time this country as they came in from the south walking beside their oxen. They would have been wading in tall grasses in the hunt for the spot that was to be their future home. The first ones would make for the river as there would be shelter and water. Homesteads were staked there in preference to open prairie even though it was often the case that land on the open prairie was better wheat land.

Most of those pioneers had been raised among mountains towering to the high heavens and shutting out much of the view. Over them the prairie summer nights cast a witching spell, when the blue canopy was crowded with glittering stars. A chorus of a million frogs rising from the sloughs and the bright beams of bluish light from the fireflies here and there mesmorized them.

Stories kept coming back to the home folks in the old country by letter and by word of mouth; exaggerated tales, truths and half truths, glowing accounts of the level land, the rich, black soil, the absence of rocks, the blue blossomed flax that could be planted in the sod, and the enormous crops of wheat, oats and barley - tales that fired the imagination of the home folks. This started an avalanche of immigrants that swelled to tremendous proportions in this golden age of the westward trek 60 - 70 years ago,

"THE SERVICEMAN" is sponsored by the Lutheran Brotherhood of Edinburg, Odalen and Union and edited by N. Ordahl.

Life is good in Edinburg.

 

 

I DON'T KNOW IF I HAVE EVER MENTIONED THAT IF YOU GO WAY TO THE BOTTOM OF THE CROW'S NEST PAGE, THERE WILL BE A CROW'S NEST ARCHIVE. BY CLICKING ON IT, YOU CAN GO BACK AND READ EVERY ARTICLE WRITTEN SINCE 2004.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vera-elroy

Congratulations to Elroy and Vera Brandvold on 50 years of marriage.

 

sunflowers

The sunflowers are beautiful. So vibrant. I read where North Dakota may use the sunflower fields to promote tourism to the state.

 

.mexican hat-gary

Gary Monsebroten had his mexican hat down to the table of knowledge one day last week. We tried get him to dance, but he refused!

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